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What we know about fish allergy by the end of the decade?

Kourani E1, Corazza F2, Michel O3, Doyen V3,4

1Pediatric department, Rafic Hariri University Hospital, Beirut, Lebanon.
2Laboratory of immunology (LHUB-ULB) and Laboratory of Translational Research, Brugmann University Hospital, Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Brussels, Belgium.
3Immuno-Allergology Clinic, Brugmann University Hospital, Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Brussels, Belgium.
4Immuno-Allergology Clinic and Laboratory of Translational Research, Brugmann University Hospital, Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Brussels, Belgium.

J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2020; Vol. 30(1)
doi: 10.18176/jiaci.0381

Fish allergy is one of the most common food allergies. It is usually considered to be immunoglobulin (Ig) E-mediated and correlated well with diagnostic tests such as prick tests and/or specific IgE. Recommended treatment is avoidance, generally extended to all fishes. However, new clinical presentations have been described, including non-IgE-mediated disease, mono-sensitization, and new syndromes that are sometimes associated with surprising cross-reactivity. Advances in molecular allergy have provided insights into new allergens and have increased our understanding of cross-reactivity. This paper focuses on recent publications providing information for clinicians involved in the management of fish allergy. 

Key words: food allergy, fish, clinical aspects, allergens, parvalbumin, pseudo allergy, cross-reactivity